Josh Cullen, PhD

Josh Cullen, PhD

NSF Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Florida State University

About me

I am a postdoc fellow in Mariana Fuentes' lab developing a transferable species distribution modeling approach. This includes the integration of different sources of species occurrence data (e.g., sightings, telemetry), accounting for habitat preferences of different age classes (e.g., juveniles, adults), and using species' physiology (e.g., thermal tolerance) to inform habitat suitability. In general, my research takes an integrative approach to understand how animals interact with their environment.

My previous work has included the use of different types of data (morphological, performance, diet, toxicology, movement) to model resource use within a single species, how this may change as it gets older/larger, and how this compares against potential competitors. By incorporating multiple lines of evidence, we can develop a more complete understanding of an animal’s ecology and predict how it will respond to anthropogenic pressure and climate change. Additionally, I have developed a set of non-parametric Bayesian models to estimate latent behavioral states from animal movement data, which are included within the bayesmove R package.

Interests
  • Movement Ecology
  • Trophic Ecology
  • Ecotoxicology
  • Comparative Biomechanics & Ecomorphology
Education
  • Ph.D. Wildlife & Fisheries Sciences, 2019

    Texas A&M University

  • B.S. Biological Sciences, 2013

    Clemson University

Research

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Development of a Transferable Species Distribution Modeling Approach

Development of a Transferable Species Distribution Modeling Approach

Developing a new transferable modeling approach that applies hybrid SDMs to improve predictions of species distributions.

Space-Use and Habitat Preference of Sea Turtles in the Arabian Gulf

Space-Use and Habitat Preference of Sea Turtles in the Arabian Gulf

Determining space-use and environmental drivers of habitat suitability in sea turtles from the Arabian Gulf.

Bioaccumulation of Organic Pollutants in Marine Organisms

Bioaccumulation of Organic Pollutants in Marine Organisms

Organisms large and small, from coastal sharks to deep sea invertebrates, demonstrate bioaccumulation of PAHs and PCBs.

Ecological Morphology of Shark Teeth

Ecological Morphology of Shark Teeth

Tooth morphology varies within and among sharks and may facilitate increased net energy intake.

Scaling of Bite Force in Sharks Impacts Their Ecological Niche

Scaling of Bite Force in Sharks Impacts Their Ecological Niche

Scaling of bite force over ontogeny and its relationship with dietary shifts.

Curriculum Vitae

Last updated August 2021